Public Summary of HCVF Management by Bornion Timber Sdn. Bhd. / FMU 11

- Natural Forest - 

  1. Background and Overview

Bornion Timber Sdn. Bhd. has been entrusted by the State Government to manage the Licensed Area (FMU No. 11), comprising a total area of 99,158.27 ha. The Licensed Area has been subdivided into two parts or sub-management units for forest plantation development and natural forest management respectively.

 

The company management has determined to have its FMU certified under the Malaysian Criteria and Indicators for Forest Management Certification (Natural Forest) [MC&I (Natural Forest)] under the Malaysian Timber Certification Scheme (MTCS) operated by Malaysian Timber Certification Council (MTCC). The total area certified under this scheme amounts to 40,645.50 ha. According to the MC&I for Natural Forest, the company is required to make available a public summary of its management prescriptions for areas containing High Conservation Value (HCV). These include standards under MC&I Principle 9 which require to identify, and maintain or enhance HCV areas within the Licensed Area. MC&I Criterion 9.3 require these measures to be specifically included in the summary of a publicly available management plan.

 

For general overview, the figure on the following page shows the identified conservation and protection areas at compartment level under the natural forest management regime, together with the relevant HCV category.

 

Additional areas at micro-scale would be identified during the process of preparing the Comprehensive Harvest Plan (CHP).


Figure: Map of High Conservation Value Forest in FMU 11 – Natural Forest Management

 

2. HCV Area Summary

The following Table summarizes the identified areas included in the six HCV categories as described on the High Conservation Value Forest (HCVF) Toolkit for Malaysia (2009).

 

HCV Category

Description

HCV 1: Biodiversity Values

HCV 1.1: Protected Areas

Milian-Labau VJR (Part A) – Cpt. 117 (117.0 ha)

HCV 1.2 Threatened and Endangered Species

  • Fauna – Mammals (18 species) and Avies (3 species)
  • Flora – Belian Trees – Cpt. 124

               Rafflesia – Cpt. 210

HCV 1.4: Critical Temporal Use

  • Pond area for feeding and nesting – Cpt. 124
  • Saltlick area – Cpt. 43, 120 and 130

HCV 2: Landscape-level Forest

Proximity Linkage

The Licensed Area is linked with:

  • Class I: Sg. Tongod Forest Reserve
  • Class II: Sg. Pinangah Forest Reserve

HCV 3: Ecosystems

Lowland Mixed Dipterocarp Forest

Cpt. 96, 117, 119 and 124 (portion)

Lower Montane / Sub-montane Forest

Cpt. 37, 38, 210 (portion), 215, 221, 222 and 224

HCV 4: Services of Nature

HCV 4.1: Watershed Protection

Cpt. 35, 37, 38, 71, 214, 216, 219, 221, 222 and 223

HCV 4.2: Erosion Control

Riparian reserve area: Sg. Pingas and Sg. Melikop (30 m buffer)

Areas with slopes > 25˚ (Steep areas): Cpt. 35, 37, 38, 71, 214, 216, 219, 221, 222 and 223.

HCV 4.3: Barriers to Destructive Fire

Emergent trees, dense forest canopy, road infrastructure, ridges, riparian buffers.

HCV 5: Basic Needs of Local Communities

Water

Cpt. 94, 95, 96, 192, 193, 195, 211, 222, 223 and 225

HCV 6: Cultural Identity of Local Communities

Old Graveyards

Cpt. 32 and 33

 

Additional HCV areas may be added upon identification during research and operational activities. The HCV area summary will be updated at annual intervals.

 

3. Management Prescriptions for HCV Areas

The management prescriptions for areas with identified High Conservation Value within the Licensed Area of Bornion Timber Sdn. Bhd. are summarized in the table below:

HCV

Attribute

Management prescription

1

Biodiversity values

1.1

Protected Areas

  • Mark the boundary of the area.
  • Undertake ground patrolling to ensure integrity.

1.2

Threatened and Endangered species

  • Set up transects in selected areas to monitor any changes in species composition and abundance.
  • Carry out awareness campaigns and ground patrolling to prevent illegal hunting.
  • Carry out tree marking and ensure protection of RTE species during preparation of Comprehensive Harvesting Plan.

1.4

Critical Temporal Use

  • Establish buffer zone.
  • Conduct ground patrolling to prevent illegal hunting.

2

Landscape-level forest

 

Proximity Linkage

  • Establish wildlife corridors to provide linkages of protected areas, where feasible and practical.
  • Undertake ground patrolling or aerial survey to prevent illegal hunting.

3

Ecosystems

 

Lowland Mixed Dipterocarp Forest

  • Mark the boundary of the area which is accessible.
  • Conduct ground patrolling to ensure integrity.
  • Carry out aerial surveys in inaccessible areas.
  • Erection of HCV signboards at strategic access points.

Lower Montane / Sub-montane Forest

4

Services of Nature

4.1

Watershed protection

  • Tree marking along buffer boundary at intervals of 20 m.
  • Erection of HCV signboards at strategic access points.
  • Carry out ground patrolling to ensure integrity.
  • Carry out aerial survey in inaccessible areas.

4.2

Erosion control

  • Establish buffer zones of 30 m width to both sides of riparian reserves.
  • Erection of signboards demarcating buffer zone boundaries at strategic locations.
  • Ground patrolling to ensure no encroachment takes place.
  • Carry out aerial survey in inaccessible areas.
  • Tree marking along boundary of steep areas at intervals of 10 – 15 m.
  • Erection of signboards to mark steep areas.
  • Ground patrolling during timber harvesting operations.

4.3

Barriers to destructive Fire

  • Erection of signboards.
  • Carry out ground patrolling.
  • Implement Forest Fire Management Plan.

5

Basic Needs of Local Communities

 

Water

  • Protect watershed areas through clear demarcation.
  • Ground patrolling of water catchment boundaries.
  • Carry out aerial survey in inaccessible areas.

6

Cultural Identity of Local Communities

 

Old Graveyards

  • Buffer zone establishment: at least 10 m around marked graveyard boundary.
  • Tree marking along graveyard boundary at intervals of 10 m.
  • Ground patrolling to ensure there is no disturbance.

 

These HCV management prescriptions shall be reviewed at annual intervals to include any new HCV categories, areas and management requirements that support and ensure the protection of these important sites. Updates of this public summary will be regularly published on the company website.

 

4.   Enhancement Measures for HCVF Areas

The following table describes the measures to be undertaken to enhance the integrity, quality and functionality of areas containing High Conservation Value that have been or might be affected by some degree of disturbance or degradation.

ITEM

DESCRIPTION

Enhancement Measures

1

Re-brushing of unclear boundaries and maintenance of HCV signboards for HCVF areas.

2

Restoration of HCVF areas by planting fruit trees or indigenous species according to original forest type (where applicable).

3

Ensure integrity (i.e. no disturbance) through intensification of regular patrolling and reporting activities.

4

Carry out species sampling (flora, fauna) to determine species composition and verify representativeness (as part of R&D and forest monitoring).

5

Enhance forest ecosystems where they have been disturbed/degraded or otherwise affected negatively through replanting the species typically occurring in the affected ecosystem/forest type.

6

Provide buffers around representative forest ecosystem areas not to be disturbed.

7

Erect signage and provide fencing for graveyard areas (if agreed by local communities), and others areas with high disturbance risk.

8

Conduct HCVF training and SMART monitoring by collaboration with WWF.

9

Conduct HCV awareness programme for staff and local communities.

10

Conduct road blocks and enforcement measures in cooperation with Sabah Wildlife Department.

11

Prevent vehicle entry into inactive forest areas by erecting physical barriers.

12

Carry out aerial surveys to monitor any inaccessible HCV area.

13

Set up camera trapping to determine fauna species present in HCV areas.

 

5.   Annual Monitoring to Assess the Effectiveness of the Measures in the Management of the High Conservation Value Forest (HCVF)

The following tables assess the effectiveness of the measures in the management of HCVF through annual monitoring and future enhancement measures.

HCV Category

Conservation / Protection Measure

Effectiveness of the Measures

Future Improvement

HCV 1: Biodiversity Values

HCV 1.1:

Protected Areas

      • Mark the boundary of the area.
      • Ground patrolling.

Effective but needs to be improved in currently inaccessible areas.

  • Boundary of the area was marked.
  • No physical disturbance reported.
  • UAV/Drone monitoring to check conditions in any inaccessible areas.

HCV 1.2:

Threatened and Endangered Species

  • Set up transect to monitor any changes.
  • Ground patrolling.
  • Tree marking (if any).

Effective.

  • No physical disturbance reported.
  • No significant changes in species composition.
  • Wildlife sightings are stable or increase over time.
  • None.

HCV 1.4:

Critical Temporal Use

  • Establish buffer zone.
  • Ground patrolling to prevent illegal hunting.
  • Faunal survey by camera trapping.

Effective but needs to be further intensified.

  • No physical disturbance reported.
  • No significant changes in species composition.
  • Wildlife sightings are stable or increase over time.
  • Birds survey by mist netting.

 

HCV 2: Landscape-level Forest

Proximity Linkage

  • Establish buffer zone.
  • Ground patrolling.

Effective but needs to be improved in currently inaccessible areas.

  • Buffer zone was established where practical for wildlife movements.
  • No physical disturbance reported.
  • UAV/Drone monitoring to check conditions in any inaccessible areas.

HCV 3: Ecosystems

Lowland Mixed Dipterocarp Forest

  • Mark the boundary of the area.
  • Ground patrolling.
  • Erection of HCV signboard at strategic access points.

Effective but needs to be improved in currently inaccessible areas.

  • No physical disturbance reported.
  • HCV signboard was erected.
  • UAV/Drone monitoring to check conditions in any inaccessible areas.

Lower Montane / Sub-montane Forest

HCV 4: Service of Nature

HCV 4.1:

Watershed protection

  • Tree marking along boundary.
  • Erection of HCV signboard at strategic access points.
  • Ground patrolling.

Effective but needs to be improved.

  • No physical disturbance reported.
  • HCV signboard was erected.
  • Analysis of water quality.
  • UAV/Drone monitoring to monitor any inaccessible HCV areas.

HCV 4.2:

Erosion Control

  • Establishment of 30 m riparian reserve.
  • Tree marking along boundary of steep areas.
  • Erection of signboards at strategic locations.
  • Ground patrolling to ensure there is no encroachment.

Effective but needs to be improved in currently inaccessible areas.

  • No physical disturbance reported.
  • All accessible riparian reserve and steep areas were established, marked and erected with signboard.
  • Water quality according to NWQSM standards within permitted range
  • UAV/Drone monitoring to check conditions in any inaccessible areas.

HCV 4.3:

Barriers to Destructive Fire

  • Erection of signboards.
  • Implement Forest Fire Management Plan.
  • Ground patrolling.

Effective.

  • No forest fire event was recorded.
  • Give high priority to hotspot areas especially during the drought season.

HCV 5: Basic Needs of Local Communities

Water

  • Protect watershed areas.
  • Ground patrolling.

 

Effective but needs to be improved.

  • No physical disturbance reported.
  • Water quality according to NWQSM standards within permitted range
  • Analysis of water quality.
  • UAV/Drone monitoring to check conditions in any inaccessible areas.

HCV 6: Cultural Identity of Local Communities

Old graveyards

  • Buffer zone establishment: at least 10 m around marked boundary.
  • Tree marking along boundary at intervals of 10 m.
  • Ground patrolling.

Effective but needs to be improved in currently inaccessible areas.

  • No physical disturbance reported.
  • No complaints received from local communities.
  • UAV/Drone monitoring to check conditions in any inaccessible areas.

 

6.   Results from Monitoring Activities in Areas with High Conservation Value

The results from monitoring activities in HCV areas in year 2017 are as follow:

HCV Category

Results of Monitoring

HCV 1: Biodiversity Values

HCV 1.1:

Protected Areas

  • The protected areas are still in good condition and no physical disturbance had been reported.
  • The area boundary was marked and a signboard for HCV 1.1 was erected on site.
  • Ground patrolling had been conducted regularly.

HCV 1.2:

Threatened and Endangered Species

  • Ground patrolling on HCV 1.2 area has been carried out regularly.
  • No physical disturbance had been reported.
  • There are 19 species of mammals and 4 bird species listed as threatened and endangered during the 2014 – 2016 wildlife surveys.
  • During the 2017 survey, there were no changes on occurrence of RTE species composition and wildlife sightings were stable over time where 12 RTE species of mammals and 1 RTE bird species were sighted.
  • A total of 44 Belian trees (Eusideroxylon zwageri) were identified in Cpt. 124. Out of 44 trees, 40 trees were measured and the other 4 trees are seedlings. The DBH for 40 Belian trees ranging from 2.6 cm to 109.5 cm was recorded.  12 trees have a DBH of more than 60 cm.
  • In 2017, a total of 20 blooming Rafflesia were recorded compared to only 4 blooming Rafflesia in 2016, and 32 out of 68 buds were newly recorded in 2017.

HCV 1.4:

Critical Temporal Use

  • There were four (4) sites of critical temporal use which were observed: a freshwater pond at Cpt. 124 and 3 saltlicks area at Cpt. 43, 120 and 130.
  • In 2016, several birds and reptiles were observed by direct sighting in Cpt. 124. In 2017, this monitoring method has been intensified by installing a camera trap so that more data can be obtained. Mouse-deer, Muntjac, Oriental Darter, Bearded Pig and Pig-tailed Macaque have been captured by using camera trap at Cpt. 124 in 2017.
  • In 2017, the number of wildlife sightings in Cpt. 43 was decreasing compared to 2016 due to natural falling trees onto the saltlick area. However, an additional species , the Pangolin was newly sighted at that area.

 

No.

Common Name

2016

2017

1

Bearded Pig

1

1

2

Bornean Red Muntjac

1

0

3

Common Porcupine

1

0

4

Greater Mouse-deer

1

0

5

Grey Leaf Monkey

1

0

6

Long-tailed Porcupine

1

0

7

Malay Civet

1

0

8

Pig-tailed Macaque

1

0

9

Sambar Deer

1

1

10

Pangolin

0

1

11

Emerald Dove

1

0

12

Rajah Brooke’s Birdwing

1

0

 

  • In 2017, there was no change on numbers of wildlife sightings in Cpt. 120 compare to last year which is 10 species. However, the species composition is increasing in 2017 where Short-tailed Mongoose, Malay Civet, White-crowned forktail, Crested Patridge and Monitor Lizard are newly sighted at that area.

 

No.

Common Name

2016

2017

1

Bearded Pig

1

0

2

Bornean Red Muntjac

1

1

3

Common Porcupine

1

1

4

Thick-spined Porcupine

1

0

5

Long-tailed Porcupine

1

1

6

Banded Palm Civet

1

0

7

Collared Mongoose

1

0

8

Pig-tailed Macaque

1

1

9

Greater Mouse-deer

1

1

10

Short-tailed Mongoose

0

1

11

Malay Civet

0

1

12

Great Agus

1

1

13

White-crowned forktail

0

1

14

Crested Patridge

0

1

15

Monitor Lizard

0

1

 

  • In 2017, numbers of wildlife sightings in Cpt. 130 are decreasing from 14 species to 5 species (2016). However, the species composition is increasing in 2017 where Malay Civet and Collared Mongoose are newly sighted at that area.

 

No.

Common Name

2016

2017

1

Bearded Pig

1

1

2

Bornean Red Muntjac

1

1

3

Common Porcupine

1

0

4

Thick-spined Porcupine

1

0

5

Long-tailed Porcupine

1

0

6

Banded Palm Civet

1

0

7

Pig-tailed Macaque

1

1

8

Greater Mouse-deer

1

0

9

Tufted Ground Squirrel

1

0

10

Banded Linsang

1

0

11

Hose’s Mongoose

1

0

12

Oriental Small-clawed Otter

1

0

13

Red Leaf Monkey

1

0

14

Sambar Deer

1

0

15

Malay Civet

0

1

16

Collared Mongoose

0

1

 

1 = Present; 0 = Absent

HCV 2: Landscape-level Forest

Proximity Linkage

  • There was no physical disturbance observed.

HVC 3: Ecosystems

Lowland Mixed Dipterocarp Forest

  • The boundary of the area was marked.
  • HCV signboard was erected at a strategic location.
  • There was no physical disturbance reported.
  • There were 93 species in Cpt. 119 and 123 species in Cpt. 124 which have been identified for future references. The DBH for 63 trees along the educational trail in Cpt. 119 have been measured. 48 trees have a DBH of more than 60 cm.

Lower Montane / Sub-montane Forest

  • There was no physical disturbance reported.
  • The boundary of the area was marked for the area that can be accessed.
  • HCV signboards were erected at strategic points.

HCV 4: Services of Nature

HCV 4.1:

Watershed Protection

  • The boundary was marked and a HCV signboard was erected.
  • Ground patrolling was carried out and no physical disturbance was reported.

HCV 4.2:

Erosion Control

  • A 30 m riparian buffer was established for main rivers that can be accessed.
  • The boundary of steep areas that can be accessed was marked.
  • Signboards were erected at strategic locations.
  • Regularly ground patrolling was conducted where no physical disturbance was reported.
  • Water quality according to NWQSM standards are mostly within permitted range.

HCV 4.3:

Barriers to Destructive Fire

  • There was no forest fire event recorded for year 2017 within the natural forest area.
  • Ground patrolling was conducted regularly.

HCV 5: Basic Needs of Local Communities

Water

  • Ground patrolling was carried out and no physical disturbance reported by local community.

HCV 6: Cultural Identity of Local Communities

Old graveyards

  • A buffer zone of at least 10 m was established around the old graveyard.
  • Ground patrolling was carried out and no physical disturbance was reported.
  • No complaints were received from local communities.

 

Compiled by         : Tan Mei Yun

Doc. Ref.               : BT-NFFP-09-03

Date Updated       : 28th April 2018